UK concern over government's ability to act in the absence of Boris Johnson

British Foreign Minister and First Secretary of State Dominic Raab on Downing Street in London on April 7. SIMON DAWSON / REUTERS

The British are in shock. Prime Minister Boris Johnson, 55, was scheduled to spend the night in intensive care again Tuesday, April 7, in a state "Stable" but serious, following the infection due to the new coronavirus, while the country recorded a record number of deaths in twenty-four hours (786, for a total of 6,159) and that the scientists advising Downing Street do not always see not come the peak epidemic.

And while this unprecedented and worrisome situation is likely to continue – no one imagines that Mr. Johnson, even if he escapes ventilation, will be fully recovered in the coming days – a question embraces the British. Is the rest of the government capable of making the complex and delicate decisions that the country may face in the midst of a pandemic crisis?

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The emotion was palpable among politicians who marched on Tuesday on national channels to express their support for the Prime Minister, hospitalized since Sunday evening April 5 in the intensive care unit of St Thomas Hospital in London .

Boris "Is a fighter", pointed out, with tears in his eyes, MP Iain Duncan Smith, former president of the Conservative Party in the early 2000s. "He's a real figurehead, he's going to get out of it", assured Lindsay Hoyle, the speaker (Speaker) of the House of Commons. "People are anxious", confessed also Keir Starmer, the brand new leader of the Labor, specifying that his party "Act in the interest of the country".

Boris Johnson Popularity

Present in the national media and political landscape for almost thirty years, Boris Johnson is a familiar figure of the British: everyone knows his blond mop, his propensity to make jokes, his charm, his communicative energy. Great promoter of Brexit, often approximate, especially with the truth, it has attracted a lot of criticism but it remains popular. Very well elected in the general elections of December 2019, he has undeniable legitimacy and authority.

Monday April 6, following the worsening of the state of Mr. Johnson, Downing Street clarified in a somewhat enigmatic way, that Dominic Raab, Minister of Foreign Affairs and First Secretary of State, had been appointed by the head of the government to be his "Alternate (…) where it is needed. "

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